Viewport width =
April 26, 2004 | by  | in Music |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

(Classic Album Review) Manic Street Preachers :: Generation Terrorists (1992)

Is anybody old enough to remember a time when the Manics sounded less like Oasis and more like Guns N’ Roses? Or when they dressed like the Clash, instead of donning sports casual wear from the Gap? I wasn’t, but I was fascinated to learn that this was the band responsible for 1996’s commercial Everything Must Go and 1998’s This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours.

A far cry from the Brit-Pop movement, Generation Terrorists spawned the the air metal anthems like ‘Slash n’ Burn’ and ‘You Love Us,’ and – excuse the expression ‘power ballad’ – but songs like ‘Motorcycle Emptiness’ proved James Dean Bradfield to be a excellent singer and technically gifted guitarist. Generation Terrorists proved that the punk rock ‘fuck you’ attitude was alive and well in Wales during the early nineties thanks to the Manic Street Preachers.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. An (im)possible dream: Living Wage for Vic Books
  2. Salient and VUW tussle over Official Information Act requests
  3. One Ocean
  4. Orphanage voluntourism a harmful exercise
  5. Interview with Grayson Gilmour
  6. Political Round Up
  7. A Town Like Alice — Nevil Shute
  8. Presidential Address
  9. Do You Ever Feel Like a Plastic Bag?
  10. Sport
1

Editor's Pick

In Which a Boy Leaves

: - SPONSORED - I’ve always been a fairly lucky kid. I essentially lucked out at birth, being born white, male, heterosexual, to a well off family. My life was never going to be particularly hard. And so my tale begins, with another stroke of sheer luck. After my girlfriend sugge