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March 7, 2005 | by  | in Music |
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Dimmer and tha Feelstyle

Dimmer and tha Feelstyle, Student Union Hall, Friday, February 25th

In a few words, the Dimmer/Feelstyle gig was everything that it should have been. Both groups turned it all right up: The charm, the humour, the sex appeal, the music.
But where were the punters, the boys and girls hot on the trail of a memorable evening? What were you doing that was so important that you’d miss out on two of New Zealand’s top musos? She can’t have been that beautiful can she? That drinking game could have happened without you couldn’t it?

I nag because I feel a deep sense of regret for you. It was a huge night. In spite of the smallish crowd (numbering at around two-fifty at its peak), both bands entertained with gusto. And those who did attend lapped it up. Tha Feelstyle dealt to his dozen-strong crowd with nothing short of professionalism. A lot of acts might take the lack of attendance as a strike against their creative integrity, but not this mountain of a man. With his heightened awareness of our Pacific environment, as opposed to the want of many local artists to pretend we are a subsidiary of Harlem or Compton, he definitely presents a strong addition to this country’s thriving hip hop landscape.

And what can be said of that sensual Samoan songstress who accompanied him? Orange stilettos, that’s what. Apparently they’re an absolute killer on the old feet, but what is crippling pain when they add so much to the act?

Then there was Dimmer. The Banter! The Riffs! Those guys have got it tight. Shayne Carter makes a reality of the moves about which I regularly fantasise with the air guitar. And his moves actually make cool sounds that make real girls swoon! I swear his hands were motion itself.

And the band, so cool and restrained; so quietly knowing. We can all appreciate that this definitely is Carter’s pet project, but where could Dimmer be without such a frenetic drummer, such a relaxed bassist, and a vocalist of questionable sobriety? I wouldn’t imagine that they’d be taunting a crowd of beered-up rock fiends, and throbbing first years straining to touch the tip of Carter’s guitar. How Freudian.

Dimmer and Tha Feelstyle owned that crowd. If only you’d been there.

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Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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