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February 20, 2006 | by  | in News |
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Why You Should Read News

If you’re an average Salient reader, you’ll open the magazine on any given Monday at the back. After you’ve finished with the cartoons and the columns, you might flip to the front and read the letters. Then you’ll flick through the rest of the magazine, skim reading anything that interests you.

To sum up: you like funny, you like rude and you like pictures.

Although you probably don’t think so, these are three excellent reasons why you should read news in Salient 2006. There are more. If you want it, Salient news has got it. Politics. Scandal. Drama. Everything you need to procrastinate at some heinous hour on a Monday morning.

News is a lot like brussel sprouts: your mum says they’re good for you but you still don’t want to eat them. We’re bringing you all the important information you need to know about what’s happening on campus and in the wider world. Every week, behind closed doors, decisions are being made that will affect you, like how much you pay in fees and decisions about the quality of your education. Everything you need to know you’ll find crammed between the letters and the features. Don’t pass news by.

News is probably the most work intensive section of the magazine. Week in week out, Salient’s fabulous news volunteers beaver away conducting interviews and doing research to write their stories. But that doesn’t mean it has to be boring. In 2006, Salient aims to sweeten the taste of those nasty sprouts, making news interesting, witty and, most importantly, relevant to you. Remember, we’re all students too, so we’re seeing the world from your point of view.

The student media is important and we’re taken seriously. Otago University’s magazine, Critic, made the headlines as well last year after an article on date rape cause offense and was eventually censored. With the Aotearoa Student Press Association (ASPA) newswire, we can bring you stories about important student issues both nationwide and on other campuses. Last year we even had access to the Parliamentary Press Gallery to bring you a student’s perspective of the election campaign. Again in 2006, we’ll be keeping an eye on Parliament to see if the Government fulfils its promises to students.

We even took on the University, running a story (headline: “Shitfuck!” (Two swear words combined into one big super-word is pretty classic- Ed)) about possible fee increases of as much as ten percent. We knew before anyone else, and we brought the story to you at the risk of legal action. Because our information came from confidential documents we had obtained without permission, the university took out a High Court injunction against us and the entire issue of the magazine was confiscated.

Salient and the university eventually settled out of court and the magazines were released. Newspapers, television channels and internet news sites all covered the story, and the subsequent fee setting process. Because of our story, university fee rises became a national issue. So we’re not afraid to tell you what you need to know, even if we have to go to court over it.

And perhaps the most important of all, Salient news will also bring you the latest goings on of the Victoria University Student’s Association (VUWSA), with weekly columns about the scandalous escapades of the Executive. It’s the job of the media to keep the politicians honest, and that’s something we’re committed to doing. And remember, it’s your $99 that they’re spending, so you have a vested interest in what’s happening with it and to whom it’s going to.

Salient is your magazine. No really, I’m not being wishy-washy, it actually is. About five bucks of that $99 you pay every year goes to Salient, to produce a magazine and to pay staff. So Salient news is your news. It’s news about you and most importantly, for you. Suggestions, scoops and volunteers offers are always welcome. And that is why you should read Salient news in 2006.

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About the Author ()

Nicola Kean: feature writer, philanthropist, womanly woman. Nicola is the smallest member of the Salient team, but eats really large pieces of lasagne. Favourites include 80s music, the scent of fresh pine needles and long walks on the beach.

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