March 20, 2006 | by  |
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Student allowance payments to increase next month

Student allowance recipients can expect a slight increase to their weekly income effective April 1 after an announcement by Social Development and Employment Minister David Benson-Pope.

The increase is due to an annual routine procedure that Mr. Benson-Pope says “reflects the Consumers Price Index (CPI) in the last financial year.” The increase of 3.16 per cent equates to the increase in the cost of living for 2004, and affects benefits, allowances and Community Services Card thresholds.

Some examples of student allowance rates following the April 1 increase are as follows, with net rates after tax at ‘M’ code:

Single student without dependent children

Category Net

18 – 24 years at home Up $3.55 to $115.93

18 – 24 years away from home Up $4.44 to $144.92

Independent circumstances Up $4.44 to $144.92

25+ years away from home Up $5.33 to $173.92

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