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March 20, 2006 | by  | in News |
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When fruit attacks – Avocados: delicious but deadly

A Vic lecturer has been one of the latest to fall victim to the dangers of avocado stone-removal, possibly losing some use of his right hand.

The Christchurch paper The Press reported last week that School of Government Lecturer Rob Laking is presently undergoing restorative surgery to the tendon in his hand after an attempt at de-stoning an avocado on Boxing Day went terribly wrong.

Laking describes his avocado stone-removal technique as “hold avocado in right hand and large carving-knife in left, impale stone with point of knife”, a technique which left him with a sliced tendon and feeling like “a dick”.

“I didn’t realise I had sliced the tendon through until a doctor friend noticed my finger was sticking out at a strange angle about a week later”, he says. “I went out to the restorative surgery unit at the Hutt and they tried to stitch it back together under a general anaesthetic but it was only partially successful, probably because I had left it too long.”

Alarming statistics have revealed that avocado enthusiasts are unnecessarily endangering their safety in culinary exploits. One Auckland hospital alone reported 15-20 stab wounds a year resulting from uncoordinated persons taking to avocados with sharp knives.

Second-year Vic student Ashlee Campbell describes a similar experience of avocado stone-removal two years ago, in which she used a large knife to de-stone an avocado, stabbing her hand in the process. “I thought it would be the easiest way to get it out”, she says. “Yeah, it wasn’t.” Campbell has encountered similar problems when cutting pumpkins.

The NZ Avocado Growers Association is presently marketing a new spoon to prevent future trips to hospital for those uncoordinated avocado fans among us.

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About the Author ()

With her take-no-prisoners, kick-ass attitude, former News Editor Laura McQuillan adequately makes up for her lack of stature. Roaming the corridors (and underground tunnels) of the University by day, and hunting vampires and Nazi war criminals by night, McQuillan will stop at nothing to bring you the freshest news.

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