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August 7, 2006 | by  | in News |
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“Just say it!”

Vic theatre games club starts up this semester.

In a nutshell, improvisational theatre and theatre games, also popularly known as “Theatre Sports”, is all about getting the words out and just saying it. Openly borrowing on the theme from that trendy sports apparel company, the new Vic improvisational theatre games clubs catch phase, “Just say it!” means that it’s all about having fun and getting the words out. The aim of the club is to promote improvisational theatre and games, by providing training, helping build confidence, doing shows for those interested and most importantly providing an outlet of fun for Victoria University students.

For those that have been hiding under their study rocks, improvisation is the art of a performance given without planning or preparation. The creation can be spoken, written or composed. In the case of improvisational theatre games it is acted and spoken, sometimes in made up songs or poetry on the spot. If the thought of this instantly puts fear or butterflies in your stomach don’t worry there is lots of training on how you go about it. Like all things improvised, there is always an underlying structure and games to play to bring it all together to look like a professional rehearsed theatrical scene.

Improvisational theatre is all about playing games, having fun and gaining back that child like creativity we lose as we grow into adults. Keith Johnstone, creator of theatre sports, puts it this way: “Many teachers think of children as immature adults. It might lead to a better and more ‘respectful’ teaching, if we thought of adults as atrophied children. Many ‘well adjusted’ adults are bitter, uncreative, frightened, unimaginative, and rather hostile people. Instead of assuming they were born that way, or that that’s what being an adult entails, we might consider them as people damaged by their education and upbringing.” Our aim is to un-damage you through re-education, success coaching and having fun.

Why should I be interested in learning improvisational theatre games? Have you ever experienced a time when you clammed up and couldn’t get the words out? Maybe during a job interview? Asking a question in lectures? Getting a date? Improv is a great way to learn to think on the spot, get out of your head and, again. just say it. Theatre games are an ideal way of gaining confidence for public speaking, debating, doing presentations, improving acting skills for drama, learning to loosen up and have fun (even pickup). We have a trained improvisation director/player to coach you with structured sessions and will be bringing in guest trainers/directors over the year. There is the possibility of competing against other universities in team events, doing a show for friends and family to gain audience exposure, and a public performance for those interested.

If being the world’s greatest improvisation actor on stage doesn’t turn you on, don’t worry, you choose what you do. If you want to come along join in and just play the games to gain the benefits of improv that’s cool with us. This is for anyone who’s up for some fun and looking for ways to help express themselves. You won’t have to go on stage if it’s not your area of interest. Although, speaking from experience, you will be having that much fun being involved and have expanded your circle of limits so wide after playing with us that going on stage will just be another fun challenge to take on.

The group meets Thursday evenings 5.30pm-7.30pm in meeting room two (MR2) in the student union building, Kelburn campus.

Where do I sign up or get more information? Come along on Thursday or send your questions to Steve by email vicimprov@gmail.com or txt phone 021 0226 8271.

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