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August 7, 2006 | by  | in Film |
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Breakfast on Pluto

By the time you read this review the New Zealand Film Festival will have ended. The NZFF has heaps of absolutely delectable gems, and when it ends it’s back to the banal sludge of common films…or is it? Wellington is blessed with a vast array of cinemas that offer a different spectrum of films for all tastes, and that is why Breakfast on Pluto is a perfect film to watch if you miss (or totally missed) the NZFF.

A joint Irish/English film, Breakfast on Pluto follows the tale of a young lad, Patrick Braden (Cillian Murphy), who was dumped by his mother on the steps of the town priest as a “wee bairn”. He grows up not knowing who his parents are, and becomes absolutely obsessed with his mother. He becomes a transvestite, and sick of his cold foster mother berating him for his effeminate ways and his need for parental love, he sets out on a journey to track her down. And what a journey it is. From becoming the muse of magician, to being a peep-show performer, the self-titled Patricia Kitten” Braden remains composed and optimistic, even when getting tenderised and minced at the police station.

Cillian Murphy does a very convincing portrayal of a woman. He can even strut better on high heels than I can. It’s obvious that Murphy is the compelling force behind Breakfast on Pluto, although he has support from a couple of brilliant actors in their own right, Liam Neeson and Stephen Rea. I loved the chapter titles that appeared like book chapters, although having six in ten minutes was a slight visual nuisance.

Breakfast on Pluto is a flamboyantly endearing film. I was amused, stunned, and covetous in two hours, time very well spent.

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