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August 7, 2006 | by  | in Film |
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Mind Game

Right from the opening montage you know you’re in for a fast paced exhilarating ride of sheer madness. Mind Game shows how a once mild mannered, pathetic man gets a second chance after proving to God that he deserves to have a second chance at life instead of the bullet up his backside that ended it. Upon his arrival back into his body he craftily evades death and manages to make his escape from the gangsters threatening him, with two nubile girls (of course) and naturally ends up crashing his car inside a giant whale. Goodbye sanity, hello mindfu*k.

Set to the sort of crazy upbeat music that only the Japanese can pull off, this movie basks unashamedly in the whole “I believe I can be the best I can be” thing, and good on it. It has some great moments of hilarity, and some moments of plain confusion, and when the credits roll, it will take you a few moments to realise that you’re not actually inside a whale anymore, and that you’re back into everyday reality. A movie theatre is the only place to watch and become properly engrossed in this visual orgy. The drawings are a little crude, but this fits with the edgy unpredictability of it. The rotoscope close ups that are used to show the character’s expressions in more detail don’t exactly add much to it, but at least they’re different.

Don’t bring any popcorn into this movie as there is no possibility of concentrating on anything but what is going on in front of you. The only disappointing thing was that I had to spend a lot of time looking between the subtitles and the rapidly changing images, added to the frantic feel of Mind Game. But hey, subtitles are a small interruption the charm of this film.

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