Viewport width =
September 4, 2006 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Hippies Happy With Environmental Policy

The University has passed a policy which aims to see a major cultural change in how the whole University will behave in a world of finite resources and pollution.

The Environmental Policy sees the University encouraging public transport, clean fuel vehicles, recycling and that the University will be a community leader in promoting environmental awareness.

The draft version of the policy, which had eight student submissions – all in favour – passed with some minor modifications. Only some suggestions were taken into consideration as some were considered too “ambitious”.

The policy also creates an Environmental Committee, which Facilities Manager Dave Povey says will have “real teeth”.

VUWSA Environmental Officer Tushara Kodikara says that VUWSA will campaign hard to ensure that the University follows its own rules. “VUWSA will make sure that this is not a token gesture,” he says.

Some of the other points that are included in the policy include: introducing cleaner fuel vehicles, protecting the natural areas of the University and considering opportunities to enhance them, and recycling.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Token Cripple: You’re totally messing with my cripple aura, dood.
  2. You Are Not Your Illness
  3. Let Me at The Bachelor, and Other Shit Chat
  4. Lost in the Sauce – Avo-no you didn’t
  5. Mauri Ora – Winter’s Comin’
  6. Token Cripple – How To Survive Your First Year at University (with a disabled twist!)
  7. Dream Diagnosis – Fire in Wellington
  8. Liquid Knowledge – Animal farts and performative veganism
  9. One Ocean
  10. Uni Council Corner

Editor's Pick

He Tāonga

:   I wanted to write this piece, in order to connect to all tauira within the University, with the hope that we can all remind ourselves that we are a part of an environment which is valuable, no matter our culture, our beliefs or our skin colour. The ultimate purpose of this