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October 2, 2006 | by  | in News |
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Please Vote – Then We Can Stop Writing These Stories

Voting for the VUWSA general elections opened last Tuesday, with voting invitations distributed to students’ email addresses in addition to polling booths set up at all four university campuses throughout the week.

Among the nominees are current VUWSA President Nick Kelly who, in his bid for re-election, faces competition from Geoff Hayward, Gareth Robinson and Fa’afetai Ta’ase. Nominees for other positions include current general executive members Caroline Prendergrast, Heleyni Pratley, Alexander Neilson and Melissa Barnard, while Genevieve Fontanier and Rachael Wright are among the new VUWSA-wannabe faces.

By last Thursday afternoon, approximately 1050 votes had been cast in the elections, with 300 in the first two hours. Returns Officer Ryan Bridge added that the figures are up from past general elections, which he says have usually attracted about 1000 students in total.

Past problems surrounding online voting invitations appeared to have been fixed, with Bridge confirming that no complaints had been made. Previously, some students registered with the university prior to 2004 did not receive emails that enabled them to vote, but the emails were sent this time to addresses students had registered with the university, instead of to student email accounts.

Voting is still open until today and available online.

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