October 16, 2006 | by  | in News |
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University Stock Market

Before the markets close for the summer, VUWSA receptionist Carey Clements drops further, for parking in the Vice-Chancellor’s car park at last Wednesday night’s Blues awards.

An innocent mistake or a delusion of grandeur? The markets care little, and deliver you a 11 point drop. Especially after having Salient Editor James Robinson’s car towed only weeks ago, seemingly for simply having a permit.

VUWSA Welfare Vice-President Jules van Cruysen jumps up 13 points, after taking being called “Sausage Boy” in the magazine without complaint. Good to see a member of VUWSA with a sense of humour, rather than an exaggerated sense of persecution.

Outgoing VUWSA President Nick Kelly drops 54 points, after spending far too much time trying to defend his last week’spresident’s column. I guess if you keep on insisting you’re the victim of a vast Labour Party conspiracy and that the revolution is coming soon then it might just come true.

VUWSA Education Vice-President Joel Cosgrove also sinks this week. Last Thursday he was spotted wearing a hideous woman’s top. Not that there’s anything wrong with guys dressing in girl’s clothes, but come on, at least have some style. And to add insult to injury, his feet stank really bad. It’s called soap, Joel.

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About the Author ()

Nicola Kean: feature writer, philanthropist, womanly woman. Nicola is the smallest member of the Salient team, but eats really large pieces of lasagne. Favourites include 80s music, the scent of fresh pine needles and long walks on the beach.

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