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February 26, 2007 | by  | in Books |
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Julia Makes Her Move

Julia left the gym feeling pleased with herself. Her assessment had gone well and she was feeling the benefi t of regular workouts and healthier eating. ‘You’re doing well, Julia. Not bad for six weeks,’ said Sally. ‘Keep at it and you’ll look pretty good on the beach in Fiji.By the way, the guy I saw you with in town a few weeks ago – are you going with him?’ ‘Yeah, that’s Pete, an old friend of mine. I think he’s feeling sorry for me working so hard and having no social life,’ replied Julia.

Julia is a young PR executive who, after being dumped by her long term boyfriend, decides to put her needs fi rst for once and get ahead in life. Naturally this begins with kick-starting her career and pushing it into a higher gear. Full of trepidation and enthusiasm, she puts her name forward for a promotion, following the advice of her friends, and lands a fast-paced leadership position. Keeping in mind that you could be in similar shoes one day, if you see Julia Makes Her Move in the bookshop you might want to consider picking it up and reading it.

A contemporary work of fiction set in Auckland, the book follows Julia’s career journey as she deals with corporate leadership issues that are relevant to young management students. Although it’s got a chick lit structure and a style that’s reminiscent of Bridget Jones’ Diary, men might get something out of reading it too. One good thing about this book is that it’s straight to the point and not too long.

The book’s strength is that it will break any illusions that first-year commerce students might have about the corporate world. The reality is that you’re often thrown in the deep end with tight deadlines, hard work, stress and burnout. There is no guarantee that you will be quickly promoted and a leader at executive level needs to be level-headed.

Its weakness is that it places much emphasis on corporate success and might make you feel insecure if you haven’t already won Donald Trump’s ‘The Apprentice’ or climbed to the top of the Amway pyramid. But it’s clear upon reading this book that leadership is not for everyone, nor are there any short cuts.

VIV BECK AND KARIN KOS

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