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February 26, 2007 | by  | in Film |
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The Fountain

Master of the camera Darren Aronofsky, again redefines cinema. Messenger and teacher to all humanity, he deserves the crown of ‘Avatar of Filmmakers’.

Beginning in South America during the colonial conquest, Tomas Creo (Hugh Jackman) and two Spanish conquistadores are ambushed while looting a Mayan Temple. During the violent struggle which follows, we are thrown into the world of a seemingly spiritual man (also played by Jackman), who is a highly evolved version of Tomas. He has transcended spiritually and is now obsessed with saving the life of his wife Izzi (the angelic Rachael Weisz).

Future-Tommy is exploiting a unique resource to do this: the Tree of Life. From here we slide gently into the modern day laboratory of Dr Tom Creo (Jackman), a research scientist who discards friendships and procedure in his own pursuit of a cure for Izzi’s cancer.

Aronofsky does not give us a coherent or linear story; instead he provides us with overwhelmingly beautiful images, subtle concepts and slices of events. The Fountain is an ambitious work of art. An open mind and acceptance of ideas such as symbolism, reincarnation, time travel, eternal life and shamanism would help you absorb the journey.

Even though it lacks traditional entertaining movie elements, it is easy to become entranced by The Fountain. It is more of a parable of our existence than a romantic adventure. There is a lesson in this film for everyone if you look, if you are willing to see it.

Fans of Darren Aronofsky will be charmed by his latest work. In PI he gave us numbers, in Requiem for a Dream he warned us against hope. In The Fountain he paints a complete specification of man and his purpose in a multi-dimensional universe.

Art 5 / Pop 2

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