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March 5, 2007 | by  | in Music |
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Orientation = Best Ever

Of the last three Orientations I have attended, this year wins the ‘Rad-est to the Max’ award.The musical acts have been well varied and (mostly) quality, with something for everyone. This week’s music pages are dedicated to a few of these shows that we checked out. Personally, I found Wayne Anderson nauseating; A Low Hum brilliant (as to be expected); and Lindon Puffin the highlight to date. Although, as I write this, it’s only 30 hours until NOFX – which I am anticipating to be the best night of my life. Anyway, Orientation or not – there are a fuck load of really great bands out there, and you should definitely see as many as possible this year. It will make you a far more interesting person. I swear.

LINDON PUFFIN by Music Editor Stacey Knott

Where were you from 1-2pm on Wednesday? Clearly not on the SUB deck where you should have been; it played host to one of the best acts Orientation has featured – Lindon Puffin.

Lindon, a one man band complete with comedy and music playing off each other, utilized his $60 ukulele, harmonia, $2.50 kazoo, kick drum and 1950s Hofner guitar and, unlike many performers of his persua- sion, he can actually sing – a great contrast to the day prior, which featured Wayne Anderson.

Puffin’s made up of part punk, part folk, part drunk and part rocka- billy. With an overlying punk attitude; he displayed a commanding swagger as he mixed his originals, covers and amusing stories. His combo of music and comedy had his limited audience relishing in his every word.

His originals covered life in small towns, using P as a creative stimulant, a song about a girl he met at a show (which was accompa- nied with a hilarious explanation as to how the song came about), and a rather poignant reflection on ‘that feeling’ when you meet someone new and it’s about to go a step further…

His rambles and rants between songs included his hilarious recent tale of meeting one half of Tenacious D – Kyle Gass – whom he opened for and subsequently hated, then proceeded to taunt him with and deny him a piece of cake.

Covers-wise, he attempted the Front Lawns’ ‘Come Back Home’, unfortunately only to fuck out a few minutes later. The songs he did manage to pull off included Bowie’s ‘Man who sold the World’, the Pet Shop Boys’ ‘West End Girls’ and Cash’s ‘Folsom Prisom Blues’.

As a live performer, his music was hard to take seriously. However, I picked up his latest album after the show, only to contradict completly the previous sentence. It’s called Lindon Puffin Show Pony – expect a raving review soon.

A LOW HUM with Disasteradio, Frase + Bri, My Disco and So So Modern by Tom Baragwanath

Low Hum gigs are the absolute business, and Tuesday’s was no exception. Local keyboard fiend Disasteradio got the evening off to a cracking start with his dandy mix of thick synth beats, cheesed-up key lines and sporadic robot vocoder riffs. Imagine a drunken Daft Punk gate-crashing the annual vintage Sega theme tune convention and starting a fistfight with Alex the Kidd and you’ll have a fairly good idea of what this man sounds like. Brilliant stuff.

In contrast, Frase + Bri’s set was abysmally dull, and not just for the audience – I’m absolutely convinced I saw Bri (one half of the keyboard duo) yawn mid-song. Every one of their songs seemed to consist of approximately three chords played repetitively over a flat, unimaginative beat. If, at some point in the near future, you decide to attend one of their gigs – be sure to take a newspaper or a good book. So So Modern played a fantastic gig, belting out their searing synth-punk tunes with the usual energy and enthusiasm – proving, once again, the damn good reason for their popularity. Treating us to a decent mix of fresh material and older songs, So So demonstrated just how much more dynamic their sound has become. From the spacious and moody opening song ‘Keychains’ through to the jangling punk crash of ‘Loose Threads and Theramins’, everyone’s favourite costume-clad quartet gave us a full run-down of what we’ll be missing so dearly when they embark on their overseas adventure. Good luck guys, take care. Sniff.

In other news, a drugged-up sodomite bastard urinated on a friend of mine during So So’s set. Not cool – let’s not confuse the dance floor with a toilet seat, guys.

WAYNE ANDERSON by Clodagh O’Connor-Mckenna

Like many in the small crowd that assembled to watch Wayne Anderson’s free lunchtime performance on Tuesday, I must say I felt a little bemused.

Walking out onto the deck of the SUB felt like stepping into the middle of a very tacky wedding reception held in a Scout Hall – or possibly onto the deck of the world’s cheapest cruise ship.

Anderson, star of the TV2 cult hit Wayne Anderson: Singer of Songs, treated the thoroughly disinterested crowd to a collection of classic covers from Elvis, Neil Diamond and Tom Jones, amongst others. In between songs he attempted to enlighten us all by sharing with us small tid bits of information about the next artist or song.

All the hype around Anderson is far more intriguing than the man himself. He was disappointingly uncharismatic, despite the perfect outfit complete with aviators and a white shirt unbuttoned to an inappropriate level.

If you want to actually be entertained by this man just read the endless comments on him by the media. The guy even has a MySpace. John Campbell and Elvis are in his top eight.

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Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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