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March 5, 2007 | by  | in News |
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The VBC Changes Frequency

Now broadcasting (almost) everywhere

Vic’s new radio station, The Victoria Broadcasting Club (VBC), changed its frequency just days ahead of its official launch last Monday.

Last week Salient went to press reporting that The VBC was broadcasting on their initial frequency, 88.7 FM, hours before the station changed to 88.3FM.

Station Manager Kristen Paterson told Salient shortly before going on air, that it was discovered that a three-year-old broadcasting station based in Newlands had moved in on The VBC’s desired frequency.

The only other available frequency was registered with Wellington High School’s station, but was in use by the New Zealand Radio Training School, whose broadcast was limited to their parking lot as a test measure.

The VBC frantically negotiated a joint-agreement to broadcast everywhere in central Wellington, except for the Training School parking lot.

Paterson says everything is now “hunky dory”, and that having a joint frequency with the Training School means that they would be able to gang up anyone who tries to invade their domain.

You can now tune into The VBC on 88.3 FM.

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Tristan Egarr edited in 2008. He threw a chair once.

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