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April 2, 2007 | by  | in News |
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Students drawn to Vic like fashionistas to polar fleece

Domestic student enrolments at Vic have increased by five percent this trimester, with overall equivalent full-time student (EFTS) enrolments also rising two percent to 14,370 EFTS.

Vice-Chancellor Pat Walsh attributes the rise in domestic EFTS to Vic’s ‘recruitment strategies’, quality of programmes offered, and the appeal of Wellington City.

International student enrolments at Victoria this trimester are 18 percent lower than the same period last year, reflecting a nationwide trend. In a release last week, the University said it has been expecting the decrease, with Walsh attributing the drop to a decrease in students from China where “for some time we have worked to reduce our exposure to this market.”

More first-years are enrolling from regions “outside Victoria’s traditional catchment of the lower North Island and upper South Island”, said Walsh, despite a shortage of hostel accommodation.

The new Bachelor of Engineering programme has also been more popular than expected and enrolments for teaching programmes have “had a healthy increase.”

It is unknown whether lower prices at Mount Street Bar have contributed to the domestic students’ increase.

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