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May 14, 2007 | by  | in Opinion |
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President Geoff

Right, it’s graduation next week. If you’re reading this, chances are you aren’t graduating, and instead your nose is stuck to the grindstone. But for those who haven’t experienced this before, I can tell you (after being in two already, and come December my third) it’s a bloody riot!

There’s the work of having to get your tickets, find out who’s coming to support you on the day, plan your big night out with friends (or family), order the gown, measure the circumference of your head, get your hair done and your shoes shined. Then you get to figure out what you are going to do with your life afterwards.

Graduation day is pretty long. Most of it is spent sitting. There’s a fair bit to remember: your place in the ordered cue based on your surname, how to hold your trencher, how to walk on stage, and the words to De Brevitate Vitae. Graduation is longer than most films and all of it’s a talkfest, so if you aren’t a fan of those talk-heavy films, then unfortunately, you’ll find it a bore.

Graduation is a formal thing, it’s a tradition, recognition that you are part of an elite group, and that many graduates are coming from families whose parents, relatives and so forth never did. It’s even more important to celebrate that. It’s a celebration, resplendent with pomp and service.

Even when you get your degree, you have to stay in the room… bad luck if you have a surname starting with an “A”. Being VUWSA President will mean that this time, I will experience the whole thing from the stage… trying to hide the fact that my arse and legs will be in pain as the seconds tick by, and that the beaming spotlights turning my brow into Niagara. A word of advice, don’t drink too much before the ceremony.

Then there’s the parade through the city. To watch it is a lot of fun, to be a part of it is even better. I remember leading the procession the first time I graduated, including handing the banner to a fellow next to me, running about 30 metres ahead and performing a snow angel on the road; a unique touch to the ceremony.

Plus in addition, there are the receptions, dean’s ceremonies, formal dinners and gigantic piss-ups. It’s a small moment of bliss, without the doubt in your head as to whether you will have that assignment done if you stay out all night… no consequences.

So, huge congratulations to all of our graduates, from every school and every level. To help celebrate, VUWSA, TeamVic, and The Establishment are holding the annual capping ball down at The Establishment on the May 18. Tickets (which are $30 or $250 for a group of ten) are selling out fast to the event. It’s a really formal affair, and this year’s theme is the glitzy movie premiere that you could only see on E! Tickets are available at VUWSA or at The Establishment.

In addition, VUWSA will be handing out fliers to graduates after the parade. Grab one and when you hand it in at the bar, you get a free glass of bubbly, plus you can pre-book a dinner at the restaurant for a three-course set menu dinner for only $29. That’s a steal!

On behalf of VUWSA, I congratulate all our graduates, and if you aren’t graduating yet, I know that when it happens, you will enjoy it.

See you at the ceremony.

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