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July 9, 2007 | by  | in News |
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Lisbon Convention recognises NZ qualifications

New Zealand qualifications are now recognised under a European convention, meaning better employment and study opportunities for New Zealanders in Europe.


New Zealand’s request to accede to the Lisbon Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications concerning Higher Education in the European Area was approved at a meeting in Bucharest last month.

According to Tertiary Education Minister Michael Cullen, this means that someone with a New Zealand qualification can now work or study much more easily overseas, as their qualification will now have equivalent status in each of the 50 Lisbon convention countries.

The Lisbon Convention is recognised as setting international best practice for assessing and comparing qualifications from around the world.

Signatories to the Lisbon Convention include the UK, France, Germany, Italy, USA, Canada and Australia.

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With her take-no-prisoners, kick-ass attitude, former News Editor Laura McQuillan adequately makes up for her lack of stature. Roaming the corridors (and underground tunnels) of the University by day, and hunting vampires and Nazi war criminals by night, McQuillan will stop at nothing to bring you the freshest news.

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