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July 9, 2007 | by  | in News |
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VUWSA to hold Bomb-building workshop

A rare VUWSA campaign action is set to almost take place this Saturday, at a VUWSA and Education Action Group run day of speakers, discussion, planning and eating.


The day, amusingly titled ‘How to Build a Bomb’, includes speakers Rebecca Mathews from NZUSA speaking on fees, loans and debt; Tushara Kodikara, VUWSA Environmental Officer, speaking on sustainability, sustainable campuses and tertiary education; Grace Millar speaking on women in tertiary education, plus a guest speaker on Maori in tertiary education.

VUWSA Campaigns Coordinator Katrina Tamaira says the day is an opportunity for students to voice their opinions as well as hear from people who have the experience of running student campaigns. The day is fully catered, and attendees are encouraged to meet some fellow students over a cup of tea or coffee.

The program starts at 9:45am in Meeting Room 1, Student Union Building, Kelburn Campus.

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About the Author ()

With her take-no-prisoners, kick-ass attitude, former News Editor Laura McQuillan adequately makes up for her lack of stature. Roaming the corridors (and underground tunnels) of the University by day, and hunting vampires and Nazi war criminals by night, McQuillan will stop at nothing to bring you the freshest news.

Comments (1)

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  1. Jenn says:

    I think Rebecca actually works at AUS? She used to work at NZUSA a few years ago.

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