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February 7, 2008 | by  | in Online Only |
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Contradictory Copy Cat Calamity

Not two weeks ago, Labour was touting the fact National was copying its policies, re: student loans, yadda yadda yadda. Today we have Labour copying National with tax policy.

 


 

The oil shocks of the 70’s and the crashes and turmoil of the late 80’s early 90’s lead most of the world to believe that the only way to manage national economies was to let the market regulate. There seemed to be a consensus of parties on the left and right of the spectrum that free market reform would ensure economic and therefore political stability. Another side effect of this was to promote political/economic hegemony, with no major parties willing to change the orthodoxy of the prevailing mindset.

In NZ the catch-all parties of Labour and National have become so similar that we are left wondering what we are voting for. As a student I am left to ponder whose box I will put my tick in at the end of this year. Sure National offers me lower tax, but so does Labour. Labour offers me interest free student loans, but so does National. And we all know that both parties pillage and loot policy from the smaller parties willy nilly.

Heading into an uncertain era of history, where the world is poised on the brink of more shortages of oil, rising sea levels, warmer temperatures, higher prices on resources, we need to stop on the edge of this precipice and ask our selves: Do we really want to vote for conformity and conservatism in the face of such large obstacles for such a small country.

New Zealand needs ingenuity, and most of all it needs the status quo to be challenged. Arguments lead to synthesis and antithesis, and then something better. Your vote is a precious thing. Use it wisely.

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About the Author ()

The editor of this fine rag for 2009.

Comments (4)

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  1. peteremcc says:

    it seems pretty obvious that you’re a green voter, so whats the point of the blog? advertising? is that really all we’re going to get from this blog this year?

  2. Jackson Wood says:

    Ahhhh sorry Peter, your wrong. I am not a Green voter. In fact I this year I intend to base my vote for the candidate on how many vowels they have in their name, and the party vote will of course be going to the Yet to be Named NZ Silly Party.

    The point of this blog is to challenge the thoughts of people like you who are so close minded that that their brains are starved of oxygen.

    ACT have a decent enough environment policy, and they also challenge the political norm. This blog was about exercising your right to choice in a democracy, not advocating for one party. It was also about the dangers of giving into consensus too easily. Sorry if these points eluded you.

  3. peteremcc says:

    Yeah I know, i’m in the facebook group!
    I was just poking ;)

    I of course also wish people would spend more time looking at all the parties’ policies.

  4. Jackson Wood says:

    YOU ARE! WOAH! that’s definitely some l337 h@>< on your behalf. I’m going to develop this post later on in the week and progress onto the topic of leadership.

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