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March 17, 2008 | by  | in News |
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Newsflash: Global warming research attracts awards, funding

Victoria University’s Professor Tim Naish has recently been named the winner of the prestigious international James Lee Wilson Award for his research into changing sea levels in the Wanganui Basin.

Naish, alongside other University professors and students, is currently at the forefront of the search for evidence into the effects of carbon on the planet. As a member of project ANDRILL, he has been involved in drilling geological evidence from Antarctica, which could be imperative to world decision-makers’ thinking about global warming.

Naish admits that although he has been aware of climate change since becoming a scientist, he has become truly passionate about it since getting involved in Antarctica in 1998. He states that with global warming, “we have a real driver that has focussed our research because of how critical the situation is.”

Naish’s personal answer to global warming involves taking steps to reducing his own carbon footprint, including conducting video conferences instead of flying to meet in person, planting trees, as well as looking at going carbon neutral as a university.

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