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March 10, 2008 | by  | in News |
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Reviews on how university gets paid

The Association of University Staff has welcomed a review of the Performance- Based Research Fund (PBRF) currently being undertaken by an international expert and involving consultation across the tertiary education sector, describing the review as an opportunity to correct the flaws in the current PBRF system.

At present, PBRF provides $230 million each year in research funding to universities. The review, which is carried out by Dr Jonathan Adams from the United Kingdom, is intended to examine the funding scheme and in particular, the experience of staff involved in preparing evidence portfolios on which research-performance assessments are made.

AUS President, Associate Professor Maureen Montgomery, said that current assessment and reporting models used for the PBRF are inappropriate.

“AUS has always rejected the individual unit of assessment as the basis for the PBRF model and has consistently opposed the reporting of results at that individual level,” she says.

AUS will be offering alternative models for determining the distribution of research funding during the review and draw attention to the international move away from PBRFstyle models.

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