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October 6, 2008 | by  | in Music |
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Peaches in… Apricots out.

I said to my friends as we walked to SFBH on the night that was, 25th September, “It’s going to be such a great show cause it’ll be full of mad Peaches fans purely there for her” and I was right to an extent. Yet there were still those who for some reason or another can’t seem to grasp the concept of a ‘gig’ and that pushing, shoving, stomping and least of all dancing are mandatory. Like the little minion who turned around to ask if I could “please stop moving” ummmm? I was lost for words. It’s a concert for crying out loud! If you don’t like it leave and give your ticket to someone more appreciative, like that dude outside desperate for any spare tickets. Poor guy.

Anyway, more importantly Peaches. Wow. I was swimming in a sea of sweat, passion and extreme excitement for one solid hour. Her onstage performance is absolutely exhilarating; she never fails to deliver a risqué show marked by sexual desire, and full of dirty little innuendos. Her attire is straight up word. The lycra and spandex, the glitter, the capes, the lights and the hair… oh the hair. I want that haircut. Actually, I want her. And so did everyone else. The crowd was largely awe-inspiring – a little dirty, a little crazy and a whole lot sweaty. A special mention to whoever threw her bra at Peaches half way through the show, it was no less than a GG cup; she must have been holding her pups up for the rest of night. That would have hurt in the morning. I envy the hooligans who jumped on stage for their two seconds of fame before getting kicked off and even more so of the two topless chicks who managed to stay on stage for the good side of a song – they got to hump Peaches! The majority of the crowd were taking their tops off and swinging them round and round, if Peaches and The Sweet Machine played for longer it was easy to predict how the night would have ended up: Naked.

The two highlights for me consisted of One: when the lights went out and Peaches had a light flashing from her nether region and Two: when two dudes started to play fisticuffs towards the end of the show. It’s not a party without a little aggression. Naturally one of her more well known songs ‘Fuck The Pain Away’ had us all shouting at the top of our lungs, and ‘I U She’ got the already wound up crowd shaking like a polaroid picture. Although for the 50 bucks forked out, they definitely should have gone the distance and played longer. It was a little too short for my liking. Solid but short. The song selection could have had a little more attention paid to it; many of my favourites didn’t make the cut. But nevertheless, “The boys wanna be her, the girls wanna be her”.

I missed Hawnay Troof opening for Peaches but the after party at Good Luck was way banging. He’s a non-stop, action-packed, energizer bunny and the blazer/underwear attire suits him well. I was expecting a show from what I had heard of his antics last year and he really did rock it. Everyone I have conversed with thus far is in complete unison over Hawnay Troof combined with Peaches and The Sweet Machine being one of this years top nights in Wellington.

For those who say ‘Peaches – Out, Apricots – In’, you don’t know how wrong you are.

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  1. Rachael says:

    Actually, it was only an F cup, and I rather enjoyed dancing topless (though that’s no surprise)

    Mostly I was just stoked that Peaches touched my bra. I loves her.

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