Viewport width =
January 19, 2009 | by  | in Online Only |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Bigots cost New Zealand money

The Herald reports this morning that:

Israelis are calling on tourists to boycott New Zealand after a second cafe owner said Israeli nationals were not welcome.

Why are we doing this? The sign comes after a cafe owner in Invercargill (arsehole of the world) kicked out two Israeli women (one of whom was a NZ citizen and has since said she does not support the Israeli government in this case). It makes us look like ignorant racist fucktards. Not every Israeli supports the IDFs actions in Gaza, just like not every New Zealander supports our new Governments lack of a voice on the matter.

I hate to make this parallel, because I believe that comparing anything to the holocaust degrades both tragedies, but this is something that some goon head in 1930s Germany would have done.

To the owner of Strawberry Tree in Kaikoura: I am disappointed. We as a country are dependant on tourism. Your actions smear our loving and embracing nation. Your ill-informed bigotry is a stain on our collective consciousness.

To the New Zealand government, this situation is surely out of control. We live in a democratic country and pride ourselves about being inclusive. Is it time to act now and tell people that it is not ok to behave in such a pigheaded way.

We are so far removed from all this violence and hate. Why do people have to continue this stupid and petty arguments here. Surely New Zealand is the proper venue where both sides could come together and talk about the problems. Show the Israeli government and Hamas that people of opposing religions/ethnicities can make it work if they just try. By protesting, by banning israelis from shops, by picking a side on the entire issue you are bringing the conflict here and continuing a circle of distrust and perhaps violence.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

The editor of this fine rag for 2009.

Comments (6)

Trackback URL / Comments RSS Feed

  1. hungry says:

    so you don’t want people to protest either?

    bad call

  2. Dean Thwaite says:

    And by protesting you are hoping to achieve what exactly?
    By siding with one voice in this argument you hope to make their voice speak louder? Until what: both sides are shouting at each other?
    Huh, that doesn’t seem a great method of promoting dialogue…

  3. Sando says:

    We can totally take a side, it’s not like this is a fucking binary problem. There are multiple sides, many that include not blindly adhering to either hatred towards Israel or Palestinine. If only there were some way of articulating this with words in some sort of “mass” medium. To bad there isn’t.

  4. Nick, you and your “common sense”. You so crazy.

  5. jack eels says:

    Your right jackson wood. we should all keep quiet when mass murder and genocide take place. If people hadn’t protested the israilis could have wiped out all the palestinians.

    You should stay in your dingy little hole behind your picket fence and fester with your fine rag that will never become noticed. Ps are you jewish by chance.

  6. Laura McQuillan says:

    Because rejecting people from certain places – like during apartheid in South Africa – is a real good way to speak out against the conflict.

    Gosh Jackson, you’re so Jewish.

Recent posts

  1. SWAT
  2. Ravished by the Living Embodiment of All Our University Woes
  3. New Zealand’s First Rainbow Crossing is Here (and Queer)
  4. Chloe Has a Yarn About Mental Health
  5. “Stick with Vic” Makes “Insulting” and “Upsetting” Comments
  6. Presidential Address
  7. Final Review
  8. Tears Fall, and Sea Levels Rise
  9. It’s Fall in my Heart
  10. Queer Coverage: Local, National, and International LGBTQIA+ News
Website-Cover-Photo7

Editor's Pick

This Ain’t a Scene it’s a Goddamned Arm Wrestle

: Interior – Industrial Soviet Beerhall – Night It was late November and cold as hell when I stumbled into the Zhiguli Beer Hall. I was in Moscow, about to take the trans-Mongolian rail line to Beijing, and after finding someone in my hostel who could speak English, had decided