Viewport width =
February 23, 2009 | by  | in Music |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Disorientation 09

A Rhythmic and 3D Visual Journey
Featuring Arte Nomade

180 degrees of screens surround the dancefloor and are animated with multi-screen projections, fully immersing the audience in a moving 3D illusional landscape. The 3D visuals, mixed live by Aye del Rivero, are accompanied by electronic music, DJed live by Niko Schiavi.

Friday 13th March 6-12pmStudent Union Hall VUW (Cash Bar Only)

Tickets: (Including 3D Glasses) Students $10/Non-Students $20 (Pre-sales from VUWSA).

2 Stages: Top Deck: 6-10pm New-Roots/Dancehall – DJ Soltwata Outdoor Visuals

Union Hall

6–10pm 2D Visuals by VJ Uji
6–7pm Dubstep – Dirty Red
7–8.30pm Drum & Bass – Matty DJ
8.30–10pm Leftfield/Holistic Drum & Bass—Narcosia
10–12pm Live 3D Visual Show— Arte Nomade

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Losing Metiria
  2. Blind Spot
  3. Aspie on Campus
  4. Issue 17
  5. Australian Sexual Assault Report Released
  6. The Swimmer
  7. European Students Association Re-emerges
  8. Can of Worms!
  9. A Monster Calls — J. A. Bayona
  10. Snapchat is a Girl’s Best Friend and Other Shit Chat
LOCKED-OUT

Editor's Pick

Locked Out

: - SPONSORED - The first prisons in New Zealand were established in the 1840s, and there are now 18 prisons nationwide.¹ According to the Department of Corrections, the prison population was 10,035 in March — of which, 50.9% are Māori, 32.0% are Pākehā, 11.0% are Pasifika, a