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March 23, 2009 | by  | in Opinion |
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Environment Column

Planet earth has this amazing capacity to support life. The impact that human production and consumption is having on the earth’s ecosystems is threatening that life supporting capacity. These are simple facts you can read in any earth science, ecology, or environmental science textbook. In fact, the results coming back from the scientific research tell an increasingly alarming story about the state of the earth’s ecosystems. And it seems to me that most people care deeply about the outdoors; the health of our waterways; our countries primary production centred export economy, and our beautiful native bush etc etc etc… so why is so damned hard to be green?

To begin with, most of the time it just seems easier to ignore that degradation of the environment is happening at all. Compounding this ignore it till it goes away instinct is the fact that the environmental movement seems to be overrun by a bunch of hyper-critical, judgemental, smelly, anti-society types—so its no wonder that few people can be bothered getting on board the environmental bandwagon. And then of course there is the paradox that consumption rocks and we all love buying new stuff—no matter how much one cares about environmental problems. It doesn’t matter if it’s a new set of sustainably produced gardening tools or a new SUV—we all love that short-term consumer fix. Another problem is the social stigma that environment and sustainability focussed stuff just isn’t fun…

I don’t think it has to be this way. Living in a way that sustains and even enhances the natural resource base of the earth is something that all people should be able to engage with, and it is a big part of my job this year to make understanding and engaging in the environmental issues that face our generation accessible to all people from all walks of life—without them having to subscribe to some kind of cult like environmental dogma.

My name is Georgi and I’m your Environmental Officer for 2009. I’m here first and foremost to help you with any questions or queries you might have about anything here at VIC—especially if you have some interest or question about something environmental. So please email me at: environment.officer@vuwsa.org.nz. I can help you get involved in the many environmentally focussed events, activities and campaigns going on around campus and the greater Wellington region.

This year I’m also responsible for:
-co-ordinating regular social events on campus—coming soon!
-campaigning for a more sustainable and climate friendly campus
-co-ordinating the campus vegetable and herb garden—which means free organic food for students
-creating an internal systems plan for a more climate friendly vuwsa
-campaigning for free education and a universal student allowance
-organising a ROCKING Environment Week in the second semester
-getting involved in the campus hub redevelopment
supporting clubs on campus, especially regarding environmental and sustainability issues and to bring you a ‘warm student flats’ campaign aimed at improving the often dire living conditions of students through Wellington’s long, cold winter.

Whoah!

There is so much going on at VUWSA and around campus this year—so keep your eyes and ears open for notices of the many events and opportunities to get involved in student issues. Check the notices to see what’s coming up this week.

Georgina Hart, Environment Officer

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  1. kassandra says:

    plzzz people who reading my comment,take care of the environment……..

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