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March 2, 2009 | by  | in News |
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Eye on the Exec

While talk of change proposals and the ebbs and flows therein dominating much of the meeting, (a report of which can be found on page 15), the Exec also powered through its usual business and did a little housework on the side.

As reported in last week’s Eye on the Exec, President Jasmine Freemantle said she would instruct VUWSA’s legal counsel to pen a letter to former president Joel Cosgrove instructing him to pay back the entirety of his $1700+ debt to the association. Freemantle reported she initiated this request on the Friday following Thursday’s meeting, but had yet to receive a reply from VUWSA’s lawyers. She also produced written testimony from VUWSA’s accounts clerk that Cosgrove claimed to have set up a repayment scheme last year. The letter, unsurprisingly, stated no such agreement had ever existed.

The Exec came to an agreement on how executive reviews and bonuses would be carried out. With the exception of those members on salaries (the President and the two VPs), Exec members who work more than 10 hours a week would be eligible for bonuses, subject to certain criteria and approval by the Exec itself. In order to claim a bonus, all members would be required to produce reviews. However, Freemantle made it clear that the lodging of a bonus request was entirely voluntary.

Every so often, the Exec is required to nominate a Victorian graduate to sit on the Honorary Degrees and Hunter Fellowships Committee, a collection of people who confer honorary doctorates and degrees upon the luminaries of society (distinguished writers, politicians, scientists, etc.). Following the retirement of one committee member, this year’s Exec was called upon to name his successor. Jasmine Freemantle nominated PGSA Vice-President Julene Marr to the position, citing her record of work with the PGSA as laudable and cause enough to justify her position on the committee. With no other nominations offered by the rather tired Exec (including Robert Latimer, who was amusing himself by browsing Facebook at this point), the nomination was passed unanimously.

In recent months, VUWSA has been handicapped by a number of server outages, which had paralysed the association’s email and internet services over the summer months. (If for any reason you attempted to email an Exec member during the summer holidays and did not receive a reply, odds are it was because they did not receive your email.) The importance of having a server that won’t slip in and out of a coma is something little will dispute, and this Exec is no different. Administration Vice President Alexander Neilson informed the group that nine server providers had been asked to offer quotes for providing the association with email and internet services, but only three had done so thus far. Neilson remained confident that the Exec would have a full bevy of servers to choose from in the not-too-distant future.

The Exec would not have much time to recover from this draining session, with the joint meeting between them and Maori Students’ Association Ngai Tauira scheduled for 5pm, Thursday 26 February. Fortunately, for their sanity, if for nothing else, the next meeting will be a fortnight away—time enough to consider the enormity of what lies ahead.

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