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May 25, 2009 | by  | in Arts Theatre |
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The Burn

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The Burn is a comedy show about dramas at Colin’s Rentals, a DVD store in Hell. Written by Nic Sampson and Joseph Moores, the play depicts the characters of Colin, the demon owner of the DVD shop (played by Julian Wilson), Marty (Joseph Moores) the employee from Otaki who has to hold down the fort, Felix (Nic Sampson) the American angel on work exchange from Heaven and Laura (Rachel Keir-Smith), a much-pined after girl who works in a bar nearby in Hell.

Overall the cast worked well together. The acting was strong and the accents of the characters Colin (Wilson) and Felix (Sampson) were held superbly and performed strongly throughout. The accents created a wonderful extra dimension to the characters, especially in the case of the American angel Felix who provided a fantastic contrast with the British Russell Brand-esque Colin.

The character interaction between Felix and Marty was very funny; Sampson and Moores are clearly seasoned at working well as a team and the change in relationship between Felix and Colin towards the end of the play added a funny twist. The play was well written, with particularly amusing references to current popular culture in music and television and wonderful quirky running jokes, such the Guess Who game, which also provided a lovely linking element at the end of the play. The show was very well received by the audience, who were receptive throughout. The lighting was rehearsed and effective, as was the transformation of BATS into a hellish DVD store.

The play is highly enjoyable and polished comedic experience. I think it will be particularly enjoyed by students. See it for a guaranteed laugh, or if you hate Kings of Leon or MGMT.

The Burn
Written by Nic Sampson & Joseph Moore
With Nic Sampson, Joseph Moore, Dan Veint & Rachel Keir-Smith
at BATS Theatre, 19-23 May
Part of the 2009 International Comedy Festival

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  1. Observer says:

    Colin was played by Dan Veint, not Julian Wilson.

  2. Uther Dean says:

    Sorry about that.
    Will be corrected.

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