Viewport width =
April 19, 2010 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

They’re Doing it Wrong

Get paid to show them how to get it right

Students have a chance to win the big bucks telling the government how to spend their money right.

The inaugural Alternative Budget Competition, open to all currently enrolled university students, asks teams of students to construct an alternative budget for New Zealand.

The wining team gets $7000 in prize money, while the other three finalists get $1000 per team fronted by competition sponsors the Productive Economy Council and the New Zealand Manufacturers and Exporters Association.

“Generations X and Y have a huge stake in the future of our country since it is on them that the tax burden of supporting any future benefits—which they may or may not receive—will fall. And yet these generations are poorly represented among those who form our economic policies,” says Selwyn Pellett, spokesman for the Productive Economy Council.

“We want to see what ideas our smartest students can come up with as a counter to the traditional ideas which lack inspiration and have delivered an unbalanced economy with lacklustre growth. The objective is summed up in the tag line for the competition: Clean Sheet, New Vision.” says Pellett.

Hurry up, you only have until Thursday 22 April to enter your team.

Competition details can be found at www.altb.org.nz

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

News Editor and Chief Editor-Annoyance. Thinks you should volunteer to write news. Is easily distracted by shiny things.

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Losing Metiria
  2. Blind Spot
  3. Aspie on Campus
  4. Issue 17
  5. Australian Sexual Assault Report Released
  6. The Swimmer
  7. European Students Association Re-emerges
  8. Can of Worms!
  9. A Monster Calls — J. A. Bayona
  10. Snapchat is a Girl’s Best Friend and Other Shit Chat
LOCKED-OUT

Editor's Pick

Locked Out

: - SPONSORED - The first prisons in New Zealand were established in the 1840s, and there are now 18 prisons nationwide.¹ According to the Department of Corrections, the prison population was 10,035 in March — of which, 50.9% are Māori, 32.0% are Pākehā, 11.0% are Pasifika, a