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August 16, 2010 | by  | in Music |
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47 Diamantes, Glass Vaults, Old Grey Wolf and TV DiSKO.



47 Diamantes, Glass Vaults, Old Grey Wolf and TV DiSKO.
Live at the Burgundy Room (downstairs, Bodega), 31 July.

The Burgundy Room is an underutilised space. Its small dimensions, low ceiling, underground location and twilight-style (think circadian, not vampiric, guys) lighting ensure even an audience of thirty will make the venue feel both intimate and well attended. Here there were probably around 80 people in attendance, making for a pretty optimal size of crowd, and rightly so, given that the night’s lineup made for a fine showcase of all-Wellington talent. One man + Gameboy act Old Grey Wolf kicked off proceedings with a hard-todislike set of dance beats and videogame glitch. He probably played a couple

songs too many (given the nature of his setup it’s pretty hard to differentiate most of the tracks), but his energy and enthusiasm was largely appreciated.

Up next were Glass Vaults, whose unhurried approach and delicate vocals immediately distinguished them from the dancier acts that made up the rest of the bill—TV DiSKO’s eclectic between set beats all but demanded headnoddery. Live, Glass Vaults more than match the command of tension and dynamics that marked out their recently released debut EP as a local release of the highest calibre. Richard Larsen’s achingly gorgeous voice was all the more compelling when experienced at close quarters, and drummer Rowan Pierce turned in a potent shift on the skins.

Complaints? It would be interesting to see them stretch everything out a little more, but this was neither the time nor the place, and after one last round of tasteful TV DiSKO disco it was 47 Diamantes’ turn to take command of the room. The effect was not dissimilar to a mass contraction of nerve stimulant; everyone danced in a convulsing frenzy, while synthist Kelvin Neal played massive drop after massive drop (and also mashed a keyboard with his beardface). Unleashing her trademark shriek, vocalist Gemma Syme swooped into the crowd and was soon thrashing about on the floor, catching the audience in two minds. Did we keep dancing, or get the hell out of the way? By the end of their set it didn’t really matter, as nothing was going to stop the duo from having their way with us. In the best way possible. Thanks guys.

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