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August 2, 2010 | by  | in News |
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Guest Lecturer Enlightens Students at Pipitea

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For those of us who don’t study law, a lecture about the South African Constitution may seem boring. This wasn’t the case with Justice Cameron’s compelling lecture The Constitution, Political Power and AIDS, held at Pipitea Campus last Tuesday.

Justice Cameron spoke to an audience of around 35 people on the topic of living with AIDS in South Africa.

His presentation covered his experiences with the illness and his efforts to extend AIDS medication to everyone. Although once unaffordable for many, treatment is now available to most people for free.

“Despite the terrific crime, corruption and constitutional dysfunction in South Africa, there is now a hugely efficient and successful AIDS treatment operation.”

In 2009 Justice Cameron was appointed a Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, South Africa’s highest court. He has been a judge since 1994 and is a Rhodes Scholar.

He has been in New Zealand giving public lectures at Otago University and VUW.

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  1. Rex Hydro says:

    I did not attend Justice Cameron’s lecture, mostly because I was under the incorrect impression that the ban on the apartheid era Springboks still applied. I was also under the impression the Justice Cameron was the apartheid era Springboks.

    I was wrong on both accounts and would have liked to have attended the lecture.

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