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August 16, 2010 | by  | in Opinion |
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Welfare Officer Craig Car-ey

This week VUWSA will be holding its first Noodle Day, as part of the perpetual campaign against the inadequate living support available to students in New Zealand. Free instant noodles will be available from the VUWSA marquee in the Kelburn campus quad from 11:30 on Wednesday. The idea behind Noodle Day is that it highlights the fact that the ‘instant noodle lifestyle’ is a reality for many students in New Zealand, particularly in Wellington. Extra tight budgets leave students forced to sacrifice nutritional value and variety in their eating habits, to the detriment of both short and long term health. The VUWSA Foodbank and Student Hardship Fund provides support for students in the most desperate situations. There are people at this university who literally survive on $160 a week, borrowed from the government. Average rent in Wellington around $150 leaves little money for food, and no money when there are bills. So come along on Wednesday, get some free lunch, and remember that aside from everything else that is going on in the tertiary sector right now, we must not forget about the fight for adequate and universal living allowances.

On a much lighter note, VUWSA Welfare services, such as the Foodbank are to be extended to Te Aro campus from the first week back after mid-semester break. Foodbanks, tax refund help, and information about a range of other services such as professional advocacy will be available from a VUWSA representative every Wednesday. Te Aro students, look out for posters etc with more information
between now and then.

The VUWSA AGM is coming up quickly, so I want to issue a friendly reminder about Welfare Rep. Groups. If anybody is interested in setting up or revitalising an old Rep Group (Creche Parents? UStay residents – is your hall still completely shoddy?), now is the time to get in touch with Seamus Brady or myself so we can help you.

I will finish off by mentioning a couple of pretty big issues coming up that you should be aware of. First is the massive rise in bus fares being considered by the Wellington Regional Council – VUWSA will keep you up to date about what we are doing in response to this. And second, the government is proposing some pretty major shifts in the fundamental attitude towards employment law in New Zealand, worth is forming an opinion about.

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