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August 16, 2010 | by  | in News |
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Wellingtonians kept in the Lifesavers’ Loop

Your next text message could save your life, thanks to a new initiative by Wellington City Council.

The Wellington Emergency Management Office (WEMO) recently launched a service allowing locals to register to receive text message alerts prior to and during the event of an emergency or disaster.

The council’s Emergency Preparedness Manager Fred Mecoy says that the initiative is an important development.

“The ability to deliver timely warnings and alerts through mobile phones is an important step to ensuring Wellingtonians have the information they need to protect themselves and their families.”

Signing up is easy, just text ‘start’ to 8987 and follow the four-step process. Registration costs the price of four texts at the standard rate.

The council has also started a campaign to recruit and train large numbers of new civil defence volunteers. With 60 new volunteers, tasks include running the civil defence centres around the city and distributing information to the public.

For further information about getting involved with the seven-week induction course, see www.wellington.govt.nz.

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