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October 11, 2010 | by  | in Theatre |
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Une Soirée Française

English and French are two different languages. That’s an obvious point. But the ‘French night’ combined these in such a way that both English- and French-speaking audience members generally got the gist of what was going on. It was engaging and enjoyable evening compiled of singing, dancing and acting.

Big ups to the MC character of Mademoiselle Toilette (Claire O’Loughlin) who moved the showcase pieces through with wit, humour and a big red wig. The precursors to the play C’est une femme du monde included the truly beautiful singing of Rose Duxfield and the contemporary ‘Flashbaque’ of the Weir House Dance Crew.

Another ‘lol’ moment was Philippe Martin-Lau’s reading of the French poem ‘Le Harang Saur.’ The showcase was a combination of humour and sincerity, dance and music, moved through at an energizing pace which kept it lively and entertaining for the audience.

The main event of the night was the play C’est une femme du monde which was entirely spoken in French. Despite the fact I don’t speak one iota of the language, it was still relatively obvious what was going on for the majority of the show. Robert Parker, playing Alfred, deserves particular mention for his ability to convey exactly what his character was thinking in a comical manner for those of us non-Frenchies. He also did a pole dance against a chair at one point, which was enjoyable.

It was obvious that the actors had a good time, which made the audience in turn do the same. And, ultimately, it made people laugh, which is always good for a comedy.

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