February 28, 2011 | by  |
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Dolci Di Love

Sarah-Kate Lynch writes for Women’s Weekly but don’t let that put you off. This month the columnist, traveller, and best-selling author delivers up a feel-good read with Dolci Di Love, the story of Lily Turner, a dejected wife looking to get even with her man-skank husband as he holes up in Italy with his secret other family. The second protagonist Violetta has a sixth-sense for love and acts as spiritual playmaker to the ‘Secret League of Widowed Darners’, a coven-like group of Italian widows who pass the time by fixing broken hearts in the Tuscan hilltop town of Montevedova. Suppress the urge to cringe and read on. Lily’s messy situation causes the loss of Violetta’s special power, but luckily an Italian babe and a cute six-year old step on to the scene to get the lives of both women back on track. Sounds like chick-lit, looks like chick-lit….

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