Viewport width =
February 21, 2011 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Ngai Tauira

My name is Victor Manawatu and I am the current Tumuaki of Ngai Tauira. On behalf of Ngai Tauira I would like to give a big welcome to all our new students and those returning to study. Ngai Tauira is the Maori Students’ Association here at Victoria University of Wellington and is in a Treaty partnership with VUWSA.

Ngai Tauira exists to support all Maori students who enrol in any course of study here at Victoria University. We provide an ongoing service which involves academic, cultural and whanau support, liaison, dissemination of information, pastoral advice and general help to all our students.

Our primary objective is to ensure all Maori students are able to enjoy a safe and comfortable time at Victoria University. We also strive to promote Te Reo me ona tikanga wherever and whenever possible.

The Ngai Tauira office is situated in Room 1 on Level 2 of the Student Union Building. Our office is open from 10.00am-4.00pm Monday to Friday, so if you are passing by, stop in and say “Kia ora”.
Te Komiti Whakahaere o Ngai Tauira looks forward to meeting you all.
Nau mai, haere mai. Mauri ora

Victor Manawatu
Tumuaki o Ngai Tauira
Phone: 04 463 6978
Email: ngaitauira@vuw.ac.nz
Website: http://www.ngaitauira.org.nz/

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments (1)

Trackback URL / Comments RSS Feed

  1. Loran says:

    I’m impressed by your writing. Are you a profseisonal or just very knowledgeable?

Recent posts

  1. Second test
  2. test test
  3. Recipes from the Suffrage Cookbook
  4. Beneath Skin and Bone
  5. No Common Ground
  6. Chris Dave and the Drumhedz
  7. Good Girls
  8. Winter Warmers: Home Alone
  9. Winter Warmers: About Time
  10. Sex at Dawn
Website-Cover-Photo7

Editor's Pick

This Ain’t a Scene it’s a Goddamned Arm Wrestle

: Interior – Industrial Soviet Beerhall – Night It was late November and cold as hell when I stumbled into the Zhiguli Beer Hall. I was in Moscow, about to take the trans-Mongolian rail line to Beijing, and after finding someone in my hostel who could speak English, had decided