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March 14, 2011 | by  | in News |
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Botany replaces Pansy with Baby

Botany has given Parliament a new baby of the House, proving higher education isn’t necessarily a requirement for working in Government.

25-year-old National candidate Jami-Lee Ross beat out his opponents in the recent Botany by-election to become the youngest Member of Parliament.
With Ross receiving 55 per cent of the vote, Labour candidate Michael Wood was a distant runner up with 28 per cent. In third was Asian-backed New Citizens party candidate Paul Young, who managed to gain 10.5 per cent despite his party being only 2 months old.
It was a lacklustre by-election with voter turnout at a mere 36.5 per cent.

The results came as no surprise in the predominantly National area, with Wood conceding defeat early on.
Ross enters Parliament without any formal education qualifications, due to being too cool for school and dropping out aged 16. At 18, he took a seat at the Manukau City council table and since then only ever held jobs paid for by the taxpayer. This has lead some to question his suitability.
The byelection was forced due to the resignation of National MP Pansy Wong who resigned after misuse of her parliamentary perks.

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