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March 14, 2011 | by  | in News |
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March for the chickens!

On March 5 a rally protesting battery farming of hens in Civic Square evolved into a peaceful march through the city.

The message, repeated on their Facebook page, was loud and clear: “It’s time to send a strong and loud message to the Government and the animal agriculture industry that factory farming must end now!”

Standing alongside the protestors were Green MP Sue Kedgley and Dr Aryan Tavakkolic, who both spoke to the crowd on the party’s support of the abolishment of the factory farming of all animals in New Zealand.

After the rally more than 50 protesters marched through the city centre. They were not affiliated with the official rally but had the same root cause. The march was loud but peaceful.

Last year the New Zealand Government introduced the Animal Welfare (Pigs) Code of Welfare. This bill states that all sow crates will be phased out, with complete abolishment by 2015.

The aim of the weekend rally was to encourage the Government to pass a bill that abolishes the battery farming of hens and the factory farming of other animals.

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