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March 7, 2011 | by  | in News |
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NZ Constitution Boasts More Than You’d Think

Professor Richard Boast is on a mission to convince us that there is more to the New Zealand Constitution than just the Treaty of Waitangi.

The iconic 1840 agreement is often considered synonymous with the entire constitution. However, in his upcoming lecture at Victoria University, Professor Boast, one of the country’s most respected legal historians, will attempt to shed light on an extremely complex matter.
“It is often assumed that the Treaty of Waitangi was the only Treaty between the state and New Zealand’s indigenous population, making New Zealand unlike ‘multi-textual’ jurisdictions such as the United States,” he said.

He elaborates that there have been a plethora of other similar contracts since 1840—especially in areas like Rotorua and the King Country—which haven’t received the same recognition as the Waitangi agreement.

Professor Boast’s lecture is part of a series of inaugural lectures held on campus. Victoria Vice-Chancellor Professor Pat Walsh believes they are a celebration of the quality of Victoria’s professors, and also an opportunity for them to pass on their formidable knowledge.
Mr Boast’s lecture will be held on Tuesday 8 March at 6pm in the Hunter Council Chamber on the Kelburn Campus.

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