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April 4, 2011 | by  | in News |
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NZ Still OK To Teach!

Education New Zealand recently conducted a survey of international education agencies in 20 countries that have students planning on studying in New Zealand after the Christchurch earthquakes.

Out of the 20 education agencies surveyed, over half have had enrolees starting in Christchurch between now and June wanting to change their institution choice. Almost a quarter had students cancel their trips altogether.

ENZ has said that those who cancelled panicked as they had received misleading press reports and had not wanted to take a chance on studying in New Zealand. This has now been rectified and all international education agencies know that the rest of New Zealand is unaffected by the earthquake and is safe for study.
Kathy Phillips, key spokesperson for ENZ, commented on the importance of international students in New Zealand.

“Export education is a key industry for New Zealand and is also important for growing the country’s skilled workforce, so investing in its future is crucial at this time.”
In the short term, New Zealand is expected to have an overall drop in international tertiary student intake for the rest of 2011. An “NZ Inc. approach” has been initiated to let any potential overseas students know that our tertiary institutes are “open for business and are welcoming new students.”
International student intake looks promising in the long term.

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