Viewport width =
September 25, 2011 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

NZ First has a Young Candidate

That’s the Political Party NZ First not New Zealand as a whole. I’m sure other countries have had young MPs before us. Sorry if there has been any confusion.

Victoria University student Ben Craven has been selected as New Zealand First’s candidate for Wellington Central in the 2011 General Election.

Craven, 21, who is currently studying Philosophy and Political Science, will be one of the countries youngest candidates.

Standing on a platform of easing student loan repayments, he is advocating NZ First’s policy of matching student repayments dollar for dollar—on the condition that graduates remain in the country.

Craven has strong views about the current administration, and is against Voluntary Student Membership.

“This government has failed young people,” he said.

His candidacy has been endorsed by Winston Peters, leader of NZ First.

“He will more than hold his own against rival candidates in Wellington Central.”

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments (3)

Trackback URL / Comments RSS Feed

  1. NZ First has a young ‘candidate’, not a young MP – currently they have zero MPs, young or otherwise.

  2. alex says:

    Just like to point out that I didn’t write the headline. That is all.

  3. Uther Dean & Elle Hunt says:

    Will amend on the website.

Recent posts

  1. Losing Metiria
  2. Blind Spot
  3. Aspie on Campus
  4. Issue 17
  5. Australian Sexual Assault Report Released
  6. The Swimmer
  7. European Students Association Re-emerges
  8. Can of Worms!
  9. A Monster Calls — J. A. Bayona
  10. Snapchat is a Girl’s Best Friend and Other Shit Chat
LOCKED-OUT

Editor's Pick

Locked Out

: - SPONSORED - The first prisons in New Zealand were established in the 1840s, and there are now 18 prisons nationwide.¹ According to the Department of Corrections, the prison population was 10,035 in March — of which, 50.9% are Māori, 32.0% are Pākehā, 11.0% are Pasifika, a