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September 25, 2011 | by  | in News |
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NZ First has a Young Candidate

That’s the Political Party NZ First not New Zealand as a whole. I’m sure other countries have had young MPs before us. Sorry if there has been any confusion.

Victoria University student Ben Craven has been selected as New Zealand First’s candidate for Wellington Central in the 2011 General Election.

Craven, 21, who is currently studying Philosophy and Political Science, will be one of the countries youngest candidates.

Standing on a platform of easing student loan repayments, he is advocating NZ First’s policy of matching student repayments dollar for dollar—on the condition that graduates remain in the country.

Craven has strong views about the current administration, and is against Voluntary Student Membership.

“This government has failed young people,” he said.

His candidacy has been endorsed by Winston Peters, leader of NZ First.

“He will more than hold his own against rival candidates in Wellington Central.”

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Comments (3)

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  1. NZ First has a young ‘candidate’, not a young MP – currently they have zero MPs, young or otherwise.

  2. alex says:

    Just like to point out that I didn’t write the headline. That is all.

  3. Uther Dean & Elle Hunt says:

    Will amend on the website.

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