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September 5, 2011 | by  | in News |
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NZQA Making It Harder To Get Into Uni

Gaining university entrance is set to become more difficult, with the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) raising the standard for enrolment in tertiary education.

The changes revolve around the credit accumulation process implemented in NCEA. Instead of the 42 Level 3 credits required currently, the admittance criteria will rise to 60 Level 3 credits from 2014.

The changes have been welcomed by Universities New Zealand.

“These changes will help to ensure the students achieving university entrance are better prepared for university study,” Professer Pat Walsh from Universities New Zealand said.
However, NZUSA co-president Max Hardy says the increase in requirements follows an “erosion of access to tertiary education” which has reduced accessibility over the past few years.

The range of subjects in which students can accumulate credits has also been broadened to include Religious Studies, Business Studies, Education for Sustainability and Home Economics.

However, these changes shouldn’t affect the majority of students, as universities have responed to funding limitations by selecting students based upon a criterion more rigorous than that posed by the NZQA.

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