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September 5, 2011 | by  | in Opinion |
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PowerPoint gets Political

The humble PowerPoint presentation may be banned in Switzerland if an up-and-coming political party gets its way.

Formed in May this year, the Anti PowerPoint Party (APPP) are hoping to win enough votes to secure a place as Switzerland’s fourth largest political party following the National Council Elections in October.

Founded by author of The PowerPoint Fallacy, Matthias Poehm, the APPP describe themselves as an international movement in the form of a Swiss political party. Their aim is to raise global attention to the issue of PowerPoint’s domination of presentations worldwide, which they argue are boring and expensive.

“The APPP sees itself as the advocate of approximately 250 million people worldwide, who, every month, are obliged to be present during boring presentations in companies, universities, or at other institutions, and who had up to now no representation in politics.

“We want that the number of boring PowerPoint presentations on the planet to decrease and the average presentation to become more exciting and more interesting.
“The goal is to render people aware of the much better alternatives to PowerPoint. PowerPoint is like a disease. For a long time there has been a remedy for this disease around, but nobody knows about it.”

The party suggest that in 95 per cent of cases the flip-chart has a “triple effect”, and that purchasing PowerPoint software costs the Swiss economy $2.5 billion USD each year.
As well as earning global recognition through success in the elections, the APPP also hope to secure 100,000 signatures in order to carry out a national referendum demanding prohibition of PowerPoint during presentations in Switzerland.

“Once 100,000 signatures have been collected, a big ‘Anti-PowerPoint Party’ (with internationally renowned DJs) will be held in Zurich for all members (probably at the Volkshaus).”
Although based in Switzerland, anyone is able to join the party, which boasted 2052 members late last month. This is a far cry from the Social Democrats Party, who, with 32,000 members, currently hold the coveted fourth-largest party position.

While membership is free, all members must buy a copy of Poehm’s book. More information and membership forms can be found at anti-powerpoint-party.com.

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