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September 12, 2011 | by  | in Opinion |
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Prez Col

You have sixteen ticks in the upcoming VUWSA Student Elections at the end of the month. That’s 14 more than the other election in November (12 if you count the referendum!).

2012 is a critical year for students. Your votes will help shape what VUWSA looks like, how Salient is governed and who represents us on University Council—so make sure you use them wisely. But first, there needs to be students standing in all the positions to vote for.

I strongly encourage you to stand in the upcoming VUWSA Student Elections. You might not have considered such a move up til now—and you may not know anyone vaguely involved with VUWSA. That doesn’t matter—Ignore the impulse to be apathetic. VUWSA is a great place to be if you care about your University and students at Victoria, and it’s a chance for you to make a big difference.

On a personal level, being a student rep and working at the heart of VUWSA for students on a daily basis is incredibly rewarding. The skills you learn, the satisfaction of getting wins for students in University policy changes and developments, the variety of political, educational and community leaders and students you meet and work with, and the opportunities available to you are immense. I should know—I first got involved at the end of my first year in 587BC (or 2008, depending who you ask).

The work VUWSA does impacts on all facets of Victoria from teaching and learning, our student experience, the design and oversight of the Campus Hub Project, to the quality of food and retail on campus, to ensuring our student voice is valued and respected. International research shows that having a strong students’ association providing independent and credible representation also:

• Improves our academic outcomes and experiences of students. This, in turn, can include higher retention and success rates;
• Strengthens all levels of decision-making within the wider University ensuring that students are considered at each level and that final decisions are fair;
• Facilitates the development of quality student-centred learning based on the relationship between academics and students;
• Empowers students and encourage the development of leadership, communication and creative and critical thinking;
• Leads to more responsive and appropriate student services, which are delivered cost-effectively;
• Avoids unnecessary conflict between the student body and the University.

You can be a part of this.  Nominations close on Wednesday at 4.30pm. You can find out more about what’s involved from the guide about the positions available and how to campaign to get elected on our website.

P.S. This column is dedicated to the President of the VUWSA of the Super City (AUSA)—Joe McCrory, and was inspired by his heartfelt and passionate letter about student elections in last week’s issue of Salient. FUN FACT: Joe McCrory legitimately thinks he can taste triangles. He also spells “prunes” with an i. Go figure.
Have a great week and think about nominating yourself for
election!

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  1. Dr. says:

    Seamus, you have failed to support the needs of the wider student body. Your feeble, self-serving response to the significant negative changes being made by the Victoria University Administration exploit your confused moral compass. I don’t believe you or your VUWSA cronies have the students of Vic Uni in your best interests at all. “Everything you do is all about you”.

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