Viewport width =
October 9, 2011 | by  | in Features |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Read Issue 24 Online!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

Comments (10)

Trackback URL / Comments RSS Feed

  1. Electrum Greenstone says:

    The Lion King 3D > Jane King’s Arrietty:

    “Asante Sana! Squash banana! We we nuga! Mi mi apana” … King Aśoka!——”It means ‘No Worries’ ” …

  2. Electrum Greenstone says:

    —————— ‘Phrases’ to Deface?

    —————— ” Born of Serbian parents in a part of the Austrian Empire, which a short time later became a part of the Hungarian half of Austria-Hungary and is now in Croatia. He eventually became a naturalized citizen of the US. So was he Serbian? Croatian? Austrian? Austro-Hungarian? Istro-Romanian? Jewish? American? Martian? You decide! But don’t forget to leave an edit summary saying how pathetic it is to choose any other version. “

    —————— The Film Book Of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings : Part 1— My first ever Tolkien book!

  3. Charlotte says:

    There’s a secert about your post. ICTYBTIHTKY

  4. Electrum Greenstone says:

    ” One thing that annoys many people about Occupy is that it’s trying to raise their consciousness. The scenario is akin to the Sufi story in which a young fish asks the queen of the fishes, “I have often heard about the sea, but where is the sea?” The queen replies: “The sea is within you and outside of you and you are made of the sea.”

    That’s fine for fish, people say, but what landlubber wants to be told – particularly by Occupy – that he’s blind to his own social milieu? We want to trust our leaders and to believe we live in the best of all possible worlds. Who wants to know, for example, that the Big Tobaccos, Big Pharmas, Big Oils and the like routinely buy the votes of Congressmen and women of our most powerful ally?

    Citizens and leaders are at one on the issue: people don’t want to hear nasty truths and politicians don’t want to tell. Out damned Occupy! Don’t mess with our consciousness.

    Another thing that unnerves people is uncertainty. Occupy courts doubt. It sees dissent as basic to democracy. When the media’s “nothing’s-happening” act faltered, it switched to attack. The Occupy movement, it said, ought to have produced a clear agenda before clogging up the major arteries of the global Body Economic […] like reprimanding Jesus for lacking a 10-point plan to evict the Romans […] “

  5. Hi – just dropped by and think the modern salient is brill -in fact far better than in my day (back in the late 70’s). Funny how many of the issues are STILL the same – the quad’s still being dug up, the avaricious rectii of the Senate want to increase fees ‘ to the max’ every year – why I’ll bet you’ve even still got the ‘the degrees are too easy’ pseudo-academic wallies wandering around. My ‘senior’ advice to all students is sink plenty of fermented juice, smoke plenty of dried vegetable substances and remember HOD rhymes with SOB for a VERY good reason!! Cheers.

  6. Servena says:

    Many many quaitly points there.

  7. Electrum Greenstone says:

    ” Today is the graduation ceremony for your Study Phase I […]

    […]

    But why am I telling you this? Why am I telling you this on this particular day, for this particular occasion, at this particular place?

    […]

    Among the 30 some students inaugurated in 1887, only 2 graduated, in 1892. One became a country doctor in Malaysia, and the other, thinking that “healing men” is not as important as “curing the country,” gave up the medical profession for something else.

    […]

    [I]f so much has been accomplished by your “village elders” like Patrick Manson and Sun Yat Sen, is there anything left for your generation, for you, to dream, to dare, to devote yourselves to?

    […]

    It is pretty safe to say that you are, or will be, the elite of the society.

    But exactly what kind of society do you find yourselves in?

    […]

    [W]hat will you fight against, and what will you insist on?

    I hope you don’t have ready answers for me, because if you do, I would be suspicious. What one fights against and what one insists on, taken in its totality, are called personal beliefs. Personal beliefs are not declared. They are practiced in the minute details of life. They are revealed in the smallest decisions of daily routine.>/a>

    […]

    He hardly spoke, and when he did speak, with a very soft voice, it was either Japanese or the Fukien dialect, which we could not understand a word of. He checked the little boy, pressed the medicine into my mother’s hand, coached her in the unintelligible language how to care for the young, and refused to accept fees. And thereafter, throughout our childhood, he declined any fees from us. “

  8. El Green says:

    ” Today is the graduation ceremony for your Study Phase I […]

    […]

    But why am I telling you this? Why am I telling you this on this particular day, for this particular occasion, at this particular place?

    […]

    Among the 30 some students inaugurated in 1887, only 2 graduated, in 1892. One became a country doctor in Malaysia, and the other, thinking that “healing men” is not as important as “curing the country,” gave up the medical profession for something else.

    […]

    [I]f so much has been accomplished by your “village elders” like Patrick Manson and Sun Yat Sen, is there anything left for your generation, for you, to dream, to dare, to devote yourselves to?

    […]

    It is pretty safe to say that you are, or will be, the elite of the society.

    But exactly what kind of society do you find yourselves in?

    […]

    [W]hat will you fight against, and what will you insist on?

    I hope you don’t have ready answers for me, because if you do, I would be suspicious. What one fights against and what one insists on, taken in its totality, are called personal beliefs. Personal beliefs are not declared. They are practiced in the minute details of life. They are revealed in the smallest decisions of daily routine.>/a>

    […]

    He hardly spoke, and when he did speak, with a very soft voice, it was either Japanese or the Fukien dialect, which we could not understand a word of. He checked the little boy, pressed the medicine into my mother’s hand, coached her in the unintelligible language how to care for the young, and refused to accept fees. And thereafter, throughout our childhood, he declined any fees from us. “

Recent posts

  1. An (im)possible dream: Living Wage for Vic Books
  2. Salient and VUW tussle over Official Information Act requests
  3. One Ocean
  4. Orphanage voluntourism a harmful exercise
  5. Interview with Grayson Gilmour
  6. Political Round Up
  7. A Town Like Alice — Nevil Shute
  8. Presidential Address
  9. Do You Ever Feel Like a Plastic Bag?
  10. Sport
1

Editor's Pick

In Which a Boy Leaves

: - SPONSORED - I’ve always been a fairly lucky kid. I essentially lucked out at birth, being born white, male, heterosexual, to a well off family. My life was never going to be particularly hard. And so my tale begins, with another stroke of sheer luck. After my girlfriend sugge