Viewport width =
May 21, 2012 | by  | in Arts Visual Arts |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

For James Hansen’s Grandchildren

Enjoy is a public gallery which places its focus on showing contemporary artists to create and further artistic dialogue within Wellington. Their current offering is Lance Cash’s For James Hansen’s Grandchildren, an exhibition which blurs the lines between representational photography and heavily constructed and manipulated images. The exhibition consists of a series of prints suspended from the roof of the gallery, requiring the viewer to undertake a journey through the relatively small space in order to see each print. This curatorial technique works well as it forces the viewer to search for each image, providing teasing glimpses of further prints in the periphery.

Cash describes this exhibition as an exploration of the hydrological cycle, the system that water goes through on its transformations from one form to the next. But the images are not direct photographs of different forms water can take, but are rather presented as essays on the way that digital photography can be manipulated while retaining a form of aesthetic truth. On the opening night it was a bitterly cold evening punctuated by heavy bursts of rain which meant that the damp masses of patrons added another layer to the concept of the subject matter which Cash investigates in this series of images. Several images became quite distinctly wet around the edges which fit quite nicely into the thematic presence of the exhibition. For James Hansen’s Grandchildren is charming and extremely clever; Cash clearly knows his way around a digital image. I was left with a feeling that all the images were a bit similar, but in hindsight I think that perhaps that was Cash’s point. The images as a set create a whispering world of water which is deeply captivating, especially on a blustery Wellington evening.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Hello!
  2. Misc
  3. On Optimism
  4. Speak for yourself
  5. JonBenét
  6. Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori
  7. 2016 Statistics
  8. I Wrote for Salient for Four Years for Dick and Free Speech
  9. Stop Liking and Commenting on Your Mates’ New Facebook Friendships
  10. Victoria Takes Learning Global
pink

Editor's Pick

Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

: 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a very threatening