July 30, 2012 | by  |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Student Services Levy

A JOURNEY DEEP INTO THE MONEY-HOLE

The University is currently surveying students on the Student Services Levy, a compulsory fee which is used to pay for non academic services. The online survey closes on July 31.

The Ministry of Tertiary Education made it compulsory for universities to consult students on any changes to the levy after significant increases nation wide. Victoria University’s levy increased by 93 per cent between 2009 and 2010. At the same time, the Ministry provided a list of categories on which the levy could be spent.

In 2012 the levy for any students studying more than one paper on campus was $650 and the total levy collected was just over $10.5m. However, the University has forecast that the levy will have to increase by at least 4 per cent as the cost of providing services increases.

Former VUWSA President and current University Council Student Representative, Max Hardy voiced concern at the Student Forum meeting that there are no incentives for the University to keep costs down because it’s essentially a “free pot of money”.

While over the last few years the University has been making more of an effort to consult with students on the levy, few details on the allocation of money are available.

   

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments (1)

Trackback URL / Comments RSS Feed

  1. Danielle says:

    Thank you for posting this.

Recent posts

  1. Airing Victoria’s laundry
  2. The Golden Speculum
  3. There’s no such thing as “post-racial feminism”
  4. Girls Don’t Like Sleep, Girls Like Coffee and Diarrhea
  5. Allies vs. Axis
  6. I’m a grown woman and I can do whatever I want
  7. Feminist FAQs
  8. On Joan Didion
  9. Ask Agatha
  10. Editorial—Issue 19, 2015
freemasons

Editor's Pick

Freemasons: Just Dudes Being Dudes

: There is not a single person who has been to South America who has not told everyone they have been to South America—not even the CEO of the New Zealand Freemasons