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September 17, 2012 | by  | in Arts Music |
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Interview – Girls Pissing On Girls Pissing

Recently Girls Pissing on Girls Pissing played a Wellington house party casting their spell upon captivated listeners and delivering their mixture of sinister and dreamy sound resulting in an epic live show. Intrigued by this mysterious band, Salient decided to examine this enigmatic group a little closer…

Girls Pissing on Girls Pissing: the name alone is enough to inspire a reaction. Formed in Wellington by Casey James Atimer of the Sharpie Crows about seven or eight years ago, Girls Pissing on Girls Pissing (hereafter GPOGP) are an ever-evolving band who have been through many line-up changes, constantly developing their sound.

Casey’s unconventional approach to music is a reaction to musical conformity: while studying Casey came to the conclusion that he wanted to do something unique. “I felt that I was playing by the rules, becoming something that already existed and stylistically getting pushed to be very conventional, so at that point I just tuned my guitar to something ridiculous and started doing weirder things to kinda get away from that… I think the worst thing people do is they really cast themselves in a genre or scene and totally conform to that. They just become replications of what already exists.”

All Casey’s art reflects the desire for something he views as very important: artistic freedom. Even the band title is a declaration of that wish: “The name was inspired by some pornographic material of the same nature, but it was quite amazing and beautiful and artistic in a way. I guess the name is quite shocking to people, but secondly it’s also the nature of people’s sexual freedom. I guess there’s a few other connotations with the name, like the idea of it being infinite, that it carries on and on.”

In some ways GPOGP are more an artistic project then a band, with Casey’s intentions being to include everyone’s different artistic outputs: “Tangiwai, me and (former bandmate) Alex put out a book of our artwork that was connected to the album and we did a small exhibition. I definitely connect a lot of my own artwork with the poetry, I guess I view it more as poetry as opposed to lyrics in a sense.”

Due to be released around October, the next GPOGP album will be one to watch for. Casey describes the new album as: “ a little more coherent I guess, slightly more accessible, that’s not to say its pop or its going to have any bangaz. I just feel like everyone’s a bit more well connected. It’s a lot more spiritual I guess, each song relates to a certain card in the tarot, not that I’m going to be pushing that forward in a huge way or preaching to anybody, but there’s that aspect of it for people who want to take that. Personally I’m a lot more happy with how it’S sounding. I’ll just put it forward and see what happens with it, that’s all you can really do.”

Girls Pissing on Girls Pissing hint that there will be more live shows coming up with a hopeful Wellington show brewing. If you are yet to experience their mixture of art and sound, get your hands on an album—or better yet, pray for a live show.

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