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September 24, 2012 | by  | in Opinion |
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Lovin’ From The Oven

Beef Rendang

I highly recommend making besties with your slow cooker. They make things taste better, and it’s almost like someone has cooked for you when you arrive home after a long day and it’s sitting there waiting for you with a fully prepared meal. This beef rendang is a take on one of Annabel Langbein’s, adapted for your slow cooker.

 What you need

  • 1 red onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 cm piece fresh ginger, chopped
  • 1 tsp. turmeric
  • Chilli to your taste
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 1 can coconut cream
  • 3⁄4 cup water
  • Approx. 400g beef (cheap cut like blade), chopped and seared off in pan
  • 2 cups of vegetables of your choice (carrot, potato, mushroom, broccoli)
  • Salt and pepper to taste 1 stalk lemon grass

 What to do …

Place onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric, chilli and zest in a blender and just enough coconut cream to bring it together into a paste. Fry the paste in a hot pan for a couple of minutes until fragrant. Transfer to the slow cooker; add the remaining coconut cream, water, beef, veges salt, pepper and lemon grass. Cook for 4 hours on high, or up to 8 hours on low or until beer is nice and tender. Remove lemon grass and serve with rice and poppadoms or naan if you like.

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