September 10, 2012 | by  | in News |
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Rogue VC: “I got this”


An academic dispute has erupted at Auckland University, leading the Tertiary Education Union to take legal action against the Vice- Chancellor who allegedly drafted university policies without any staff input.

TEU branch co-president Paul Taillon has published an open letter outlining the union’s ‘bitter disappointment’ with Vice-Chancellor Stuart McCutcheon’s proposed ‘Academic Standards’ policies which breaches clause

2.6 of their Academic Collective Agreement which “mandates ‘participatory processes’ when reviewing key University policies.”

“Had the Vice-Chancellor properly notified the union of intention to review


the Academic Grades-Standards and Criteria policy, the TEU would have gladly participated in a working group to develop a proposal,” says Mr Taillon.

Although the Vice-Chancellor now intends to present his policies to a ‘Review Group,’ he is free to ignore any recommendations they make.

TEU members are urged not to engage with the Vice-Chancellor’s review process, and the branch is planning to stage informal protests outside each of the review briefings.

“Sadly, it appears that the era of collegial participation in University governance was not meant to be,” said Taillon.

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